2021 new arrival Mission to online sale Paris: A high quality Novel online sale

2021 new arrival Mission to online sale Paris: A high quality Novel online sale

2021 new arrival Mission to online sale Paris: A high quality Novel online sale
2021 new arrival Mission to online sale Paris: A high quality Novel online sale__after

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“A master spy novelist.”—The Wall Street Journal
 
“Page after page is dazzling.”—James Patterson
 
NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER
 
Late summer, 1938. Hollywood film star Fredric Stahl is on his way to Paris to make a movie. The Nazis know he’s coming—a secret bureau within the Reich has been waging political warfare against France, and for their purposes, Fredric Stahl is a perfect agent of influence. What they don’t know is that Stahl, horrified by the Nazi war on Jews and intellectuals, has become part of an informal spy service run out of the American embassy. Mission to Paris is filled with heart-stopping tension, beautifully drawn scenes of romance, and extraordinarily alive characters: foreign assassins; a glamorous Russian actress-turned-spy; and the women in Stahl’s life. At the center of the novel is the city of Paris—its bistros, hotels grand and anonymous, and the Parisians, living every night as though it were their last. Alan Furst brings to life both a dark time in history and the passion of the human hearts that fought to survive it.
 
Praise for Mission to Paris
 
“The most talented espionage novelist of our generation.”—Vince Flynn
 
“Vividly re-creates the excitement and growing gloom of the City of Light in 1938–39 . . . It doesn’t get more action-packed and grippingly atmospheric than this.” —The Boston Globe

“One of [Furst’s] best . . . This is the romantic Paris to make a tourist weep. . . . In Furst’s densely populated books, hundreds of minor characters—clerks, chauffeurs, soldiers, whores—all whirl around his heroes in perfect focus for a page or two, then dot by dot, face by face, they vanish, leaving a heartbreaking sense of the vast Homeric epic that was World War II and the smallness of almost every life that was caught up in it.”— The New York Times Book Review
 
“A book no reader will put down until the final page . . . Critics compare [Alan] Furst to Graham Greene and John le Carré [as] a master of historical espionage.”— Library Journal (starred review)
 
“Alan Furst’s writing reminds me of a swim in perfect water on a perfect day, fluid and exquisite. One wants the feeling to go on forever, the book to never end. . . . Furst is one of the finest spy novelists working today.”— Publishers Weekly

Review

“This is the romantic Paris to make a tourist weep … The brilliant historical flourishes seem to create – or recreate – a world … In Furst’s densely populated books, hundred of minor characters – clerks, chauffeurs, soldiers, whores – all whirl around his heroes in perfect focus for a page or two, then dot by dot, face by face, they vanish, leaving a heartbreaking sense of the vast Homeric epic that was World War II and the smallness of almost every life that was caught up in it.”
The New York Times Book Review

Alan Furst again shows why he is a grandmaster of the historical espionage genre. Furst not only vividly re-creates the excitement and growing gloom of the City of Light in 1938-39, as war with Nazi Germany looms, but also demonstrates a profound knowledge of the political divisions and cultural sensibilities of that bygone era … As summer or subway reading goes, it doesn''t get more action-packed and grippingly atmospheric than this.”
The Boston Globe

“Between them, Fredric and Paris make this a book no reader will put down to the final page. Furst evokes the city and the prewar anxiety with exquisite tension that is only a bit relieved by Fredric’s encounters with several women, each a vivid and attractive character. Critics compare Furst to Graham Greene and John le Carré, but the time has come for this much-published author (this is his ninth World War II novel after Spies of the Balkans) to occupy his own pinnacle as a master of historical espionage.”
—Library Journal (starred)

“Furst conveys a strong sense of the era, when responding to a knock might open the door to the end of one’s days. The novel recalls a time when black and white applied to both movies and moral choices. It’s a tale with wide appeal.”
Kirkus (starred)

“[Furst] is most at home in Paris, which is why legions of his fans, upon seeing only the title of his latest book, will immediately feel pulses quicken … Furst has been doing this and doing it superbly for a long time now … Long ago Furst made the jump from genre favorite to mainstream bestsellerdom; returning to his signature setting, Paris, he only stands to climb higher.”
—Booklist (starred)
 
“Alan Furst’s writing reminds me of a swim in perfect water on a perfect day, fluid and exquisite. One wants the feeling to go on forever, the book to never end … Like Graham Greene, Furst creates believable characters caught up, with varying degrees of willingness, in the parade of political life. And because they care, the reader does, too … Furst is one of the finest spy novelists working today, and, from boudoir to the beach, Mission to Paris is perfect summer reading.”
—Publisher’s Weekly
 
“The writing in Mission to Paris, sentence after sentence, page after page, is dazzling. If you are a John le Carré fan, this is definitely a novel for you.”
—James Patterson
 
"I am a huge fan of Alan Furst. Furst is the best in the business--the most talented espionage novelist of our generation."
—Vince Flynn

“Reading Mission to Paris is like sipping a fine Chateau Margaux: Sublime!”
—Erik Larson

About the Author

Alan Furst is widely recognized as the master of the historical spy novel. Now translated into eighteen languages, he is the author of Night Soldiers, Dark Star, The Polish Officer, The World at Night, Red Gold, Kingdom of Shadows, Blood of Victory, Dark Voyage, The Foreign Correspondent, The Spies of Warsaw, and Spies of the Balkans. Born in New York, he lived for many years in Paris, and now lives on Long Island.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

the necessity of reforming the church

A Humble Exhortation to the most invincible Emperor Charles V and the most illustrious Princes and other Orders, now holding a Diet of the Empire at Spires that they seriously undertake the task of restoring the Church presented in the name of all those who wish Christ to reign by Dr. John Calvin

August Emperor,

This Diet is summoned by you in order at last to deliberate and decide, along with the Most Illustrious Princes and other Orders of the Empire, upon the means of ameliorating the present condition of the Church, which we all see to be very miserable and almost desperate. Now, therefore, while you sit for this consultation, I humbly beg and implore, first of your Imperial Majesty, and at the same time of you also, Most Illustrious Princes and distinguished gentlemen, that you will not decline to read and diligently consider what I have to lay before you. The magnitude and weight of the cause may well incite you to an eagerness to listen. I shall set the matter so plainly in front of you that you can have no difficulty in determining what part you must play. Whoever I am, I here profess to plead in defense both of sound doctrine and of the Church. In this character I seem at all events entitled to expect that you will not deny me audience, until such time as it may appear whether I falsely usurp the character, or whether I faithfully perform its duties and make good what I profess. But though I feel that I am by no means equal to so great a task, yet I am not at all afraid that, after you have heard the nature of my office, I shall be accused either of folly or presumption in having ventured thus to bring this matter before you. There are two things by which men are wont to recommend, or at least to justify, their conduct. If a thing is done honestly and from pious zeal, we deem it worthy of praise; if it is done under the pressure of public necessity, we at least deem it not unworthy of excuse. Since both of these apply here, I am confident, such is your equity, that I shall easily approve my design in your eyes. For where can I exert myself to better purpose or more honestly, where, too, in a matter at this time more necessary, than in attempting, according to my ability, to aid the Church of Christ, whose claims it is lawful in no instance to deny, and which is now in grievous distress and in extreme danger? But there is no occasion for a long preface concerning myself. Receive what I say as if it were the united voice of all who either have already taken care to restore the Church or desire that it should be restored to true order. On my side are several exalted Princes and not a few distinguished communities. For all these I speak though an individual, so that it is more truly they who at the same time and with one mouth speak through me. To these add the countless multitude of pious men, scattered over the various regions of the Christian world, who yet unanimously concur with me in this pleading. In short, regard this as the common address of all who so earnestly deplore the present corruption of the Church that they are unable to bear it any longer and are determined not to rest till they see some amendment. I know with what odious names we are marked down for disgrace; but meanwhile, whatever be the name by which it is thought proper to call us, hear our cause, and after that judge what place we are entitled to hold.

First, then, the question is not whether the Church suffers from many and grievous diseases, for this is admitted even by all moderate judges; but whether the diseases are of a kind whose cure admits of no longer delay, so that it is neither useful nor proper to wait upon too slow remedies. We are accused of rash and impious innovation, for having ventured to propose any change at all in the former state of the Church. What? Even if it has been done with good cause and not imperfectly? I hear there are persons who, even in this case, do not hesitate to condemn us; they think us right indeed in desiring amendment, but not right in attempting it. From them, all I would ask at present is that for a little they suspend judgment until I shall have shown from the facts that we have not been prematurely hasty, have attempted nothing rashly, nothing alien to our duty, and have in short done nothing until compelled by the highest necessity. To enable me to prove this, it is necessary to attend to the matters in dispute.

We maintain to start with that when God raised up Luther and others who held forth a torch to light us into the way of salvation and on whose ministry our churches are founded and built, those heads of doctrine in which the truth of our religion, those in which the pure and legitimate worship of God, and those in which the salvation of men are comprehended, were in a great measure obsolete. We maintain that the use of the sacraments was in many ways vitiated and polluted. And we maintain that the government of the Church was converted into a species of horrible and insufferable tyranny. But perhaps these statements have not force enough to move certain individuals until they are better explained. This, therefore, I will do, not as the subject demands, but as far as my ability will permit. Here, however, I have no intention to review and discuss all our controversies; that would require a long discourse, and this is not the place for it. I wish only to demonstrate how just and necessary the causes were which forced us to the changes for which we are blamed.

To accomplish this, I must show that the particular remedies which the Reformers employed were apt and salutary; not here intending to describe the manner in which we proceeded (for this will afterward be seen), but only to make it manifest that we have had no other end in view than to ameliorate in some degree the very miserable condition of the Church. Our doctrine has been, and is every day, assailed by many cruel calumnies. Some declaim loudly against it in sermons; others attack and ridicule it in their writings. Both rake together everything by which they hope to bring it into disrepute among the ignorant. But there is in men’s hands the Confession of our Faith, which we presented to your Imperial Majesty. It clearly testifies how undeservedly we are harassed by so many odious accusations. We have always been ready in times past, as we are at the present day, to render an account of our doctrine. In a word, there is no doctrine preached in our churches but that which we openly profess. As to contested points, they are clearly and honestly explained in our Confession, while everything relating to them has been copiously treated and diligently expounded by our writers. Hence judges who are not unjust must be satisfied how far we are from every kind of impiety. This much certainly must be clear alike to just and unjust, that the Reformers have done no small service to the Church in stirring up the world as from the deep darkness of ignorance to read the Scriptures, in laboring diligently to make them better understood, and in happily throwing light on certain points of doctrine of the highest practical importance. In sermons little else used to be heard than old wives’ fables and fictions equally frivolous. The schools resounded with brawling questions, but Scripture was seldom mentioned. Those who held the government of the Church had this one concern, to prevent any diminution of their gains. Accordingly, they readily tolerated whatever brought grist to their mill. Even the most prejudiced admit that our people have in some degree reformed these evils, however much they may impugn our doctrine at other points.

But I do not wish that all the profit the Church has derived from our labor should avail to mitigate our fault, if in any other respect we have injured her. Therefore let there be an examination of our whole doctrine, of our form of administering the sacraments, and our method of governing the Church; and in none of these three things will it be found that we have made any change in the old form, without attempting to restore it to the exact standard of the Word of God.

All our controversies concerning doctrine relate either to the legitimate worship of God or to the ground of salvation. As to the former, certainly we exhort men to worship God in neither a frigid nor a careless manner; and while we point out the way, we neither lose sight of the end, nor omit anything which is relevant to the matter. We proclaim the glory of God in terms far loftier than it was wont to be proclaimed before, and we earnestly labor to make the perfections in which his glory shines better and better known. His benefits toward ourselves we extol as eloquently as we can. Thus men are incited to reverence his majesty, render due homage to his greatness, feel due gratitude for his mercies, and unite in showing forth his praise. In this way there is infused into their hearts that solid confidence which afterward gives birth to prayer. In this way too each one is trained to genuine self-denial, so that his will being brought into obedience to God, he bids farewell to his own desires. In short, as God requires us to worship him in a spiritual manner, so we with all zeal urge men to all the spiritual sacrifices which he commends.

Even our enemies cannot deny our assiduity in these exhortations, that men look for the good which they desire from none but God, that they confide in his power, trust in his goodness, depend on his truth, and turn to him with the whole heart, rest on him with full hope, and resort to him in necessity, that is, at every moment, and ascribe to him every good thing enjoyed, and testify to this by expressions of praise. That none may be deterred by difficulty of access, we proclaim that a fountain of all blessings is offered us in Christ, from which we may draw everything needful. Our writings are witnesses, and our sermons also, how frequent and sedulous we are in recommending true repentance, urging men to renounce their reason, their carnal desires, and themselves entirely, that they may be brought into obedience to God alone, and live no longer to themselves but to him. Nor indeed do we overlook external duties and works of charity, which follow on such renewal. This, I say, is the sure and unerring form of divine worship, which we know that he approves, because it is the form which his Word prescribes. These are the only sacrifices of the Christian Church which have attestation from him.

Since, therefore, in our churches, God alone is adored in pure form without superstition, since his goodness, wisdom, power, truth, and other perfections are there preached more fully than anywhere else, since he is invoked with true faith in the name of Christ, his mercies celebrated with both heart and tongue, and men constantly urged to a simple and sincere obedience; since in short nothing is heard but what tends to promote the sanctification of his name, what cause have those who call themselves Christians to take us up so ill? First, since they love darkness rather than light, they cannot tolerate the sharpness with which we, as in duty bound, rebuke the gross idolatry which is apparent everywhere in the world. When God is worshipped in images, when fictitious worship is instituted in his name, when supplication is made to the images of saints, and divine honors paid to dead men’s bones and other similar things, we call them abominations as they are. For this cause, those who hate our doctrine inveigh against us and represent us as heretics who dare to abolish the worship of God as approved of old by the Church. Concerning this name of Church, which they are ever and anon holding up before them as a kind of shield, we will shortly speak. Meanwhile how perverse, when these infamous corruptions are manifest, not only to defend them, but to dissemble and represent them as the genuine worship of God!

Both sides confess that in the sight of God idolatry is an execrable crime. But when we attack the worship of images, our adversaries immediately take the opposite side and lend support to the crime which they had with us verbally condemned. Indeed, as is more ridiculous, while they agree with us as to the term in Greek, it is no sooner turned into Latin than their opposition begins. For they strenuously defend the veneration of images, though they condemn idolatry. But these ingenious men deny that the honor which they pay to images is worship, as if, when compared with ancient idolatry, it were possible to see any difference. Idolaters pretended that they worshipped the celestial gods, though under corporeal figures which represented them. What else do our adversaries pretend? But is God satisfied with such excuses? Did the prophets on this account cease to rebuke the madness of the Egyptians, when, out of the secret mysteries of their theology, they drew subtle distinctions under which to screen themselves? What too do we suppose the brazen serpent which the Jews worshipped to have been, but something which they honored as a representation of God? “The Gentiles,” says Ambrose (in Ps. 118), “worship wood, because they think it an image of God, whereas the invisible image of God is not in that which is seen, but precisely in that which is not seen.” But what is done today? Do they not prostrate themselves before images, as if God were present in them? Unless they supposed the power and grace of God to be attached to pictures and statues, would they flee to them when they desired to pray?

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4 out of 54 out of 5
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Blue in Washington (Barry Ballow)
3.0 out of 5 starsVine Customer Review of Free Product
Actor, hedonist, spy - 3+
Reviewed in the United States on October 18, 2019
Allan Furst''s WWII-era espionage novels are always entertaining and "Mission to Paris" is no exception. In the tradition of the author''s previous work, there is a male protagonist working against the Nazis in a European setting (Paris and Berlin mostly this time), with a... See more
Allan Furst''s WWII-era espionage novels are always entertaining and "Mission to Paris" is no exception. In the tradition of the author''s previous work, there is a male protagonist working against the Nazis in a European setting (Paris and Berlin mostly this time), with a supporting cast of interesting characters (friends, lovers, collaborators and conniving opponents with vicious intent). Fans of the genre know that Furst''s books are a kind of literary comfort food--this one is French bistro cuisine all the way.

More specifically, the focus of "Mission..." is film actor Fredric Stahl, an Austrian-born emigre who has built a successful career in Hollywood and finds himself, in mid-1938, loaned out by his studio to a French film company to star in a "Beau Geste" kind of flick that ironically is a commentary on the tragedies of war. Arriving in Paris, Stahl soon finds himself the center of attention for a group of German sympathizers bent on keeping France from opposing Hitler''s ambitions in Europe. Stahl''s own nascent political views are very much in the other direction and he is gradually dragged into a propaganda war that is heating up in Paris and elsewhere. All of this happens, while he undertakes the demanding work of making the film, "Apres La Guerre". Eventually, and very much against his own will and inclination, Stahl''s position as a highly visible public figure leads to increasingly dangerous involvement with the Nazis.

While "Mission to Paris" is a good read, I found it to have less edge and dynamic tension than most of its predecessors. The protagonist, for example, is a decent and interesting guy, but doesn''t come across as the brightest bulb in the chandelier at times. He''s a bit jaded and ambivalent about most everything in his rather soft life, but is definitely committed to maintaining his creature comforts which include wine, women and food, more or less in that order. Stahl''s anti-Nazism is instinctive but not especially active or passionate, even at the end of the story when the situation becomes increasingly dangerous for him and his nearest and dearest.

The opposition (Nazis mostly) doesn''t didn''t seem that compelling either. The Paris-based German spies and operatives are often bumblers and/or cartoonish. The most dangerous among this crowd turns out to be a bit lazy in the end. Secondary characters and their connections with protagonist Stahl are not always convincing (for me, at least).

Despite my qualms, I should add that author Furst has provided an interesting context for the book--the cafes, hotels and boulevards of Paris, and the backdrop of pre-WWII filmmaking is extremely interesting--engrossing even. Overall, this is a pleasant and enjoyable read, even if it doesn''t always stir you.
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SteveTop Contributor: Golf
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not up to Furst''s usual standard
Reviewed in the United States on March 14, 2020
When I started this book, I immediately noticed how much more juvenile the writing is, compared to Furst''s usually well-researched plots. Oh well, an easy read. But there are a number of flaws: 1) character development: although the main character is attempted with depth,... See more
When I started this book, I immediately noticed how much more juvenile the writing is, compared to Furst''s usually well-researched plots. Oh well, an easy read. But there are a number of flaws: 1) character development: although the main character is attempted with depth, we only get skin deep by his reactions to situations, not his true beliefs, 2) a number of irrelevant side stories of characters, objects and incidents that have no bearing on the plot, 3) introduction of major players very late in the book, 4) non-resolution of major players who, after bearing the (limited) action, simply disappear, 5) a sudden teenager-like diversion of the main character late in the book to pursue purient interests 6) a rushed, condensed, unsatisfying ending. After such good novels like The Foreign Correspondent, The Polish Officer, The Spies of Warsaw, and even Spies of the Balkans, I concluded this was either written by a different author, or was meant as an outline for a screenplay, since it''s about the film industry (who loves making movies about itself). There is very little of historical relevance. This book belongs in the juvenile section.
4 people found this helpful
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Jim Thomsen
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Popcorn Prose and Pallid Characters Amid Perfectly Researched Period Storytelling
Reviewed in the United States on January 30, 2021
Every time I read an Alan Furst novel, I''m struck by three things in conflict, and MISSION TO PARIS is no exception: — First-rate research. Alan Furst knows pre-World War II Europe as only a person who lived in it in it could, only he hasn''t. That is a testament... See more
Every time I read an Alan Furst novel, I''m struck by three things in conflict, and MISSION TO PARIS is no exception:

— First-rate research. Alan Furst knows pre-World War II Europe as only a person who lived in it in it could, only he hasn''t. That is a testament to his immersive passion for this time and place, and to his patient sifting for the best narrative-worthy nuggets from what must be an intimidating wealth of resources on it. For not only does he know his time and place, he knows what belongs and what doesn''t in order to make his stories work.

— Flat atmosphere and dialogue. For all Alan Furst must know about this time and place, he rarely rises above the mundane in his efforts to evoke it. Beyond stick descriptions of cigarettes and coffee and sidewalk cafes and greatcoats and the like, there''s little that fully engages the cerebral center that controls our five senses. He just doesn''t have that extra literary gear. And when he occasionally comes close — "Walking slowly, looking at everything, he couldn’t get enough of the Parisian air: it smelled of a thousand years of rain dripping on stone, smelled of rough black tobacco and garlic and drains, of perfume, of potatoes frying in fat" — such moments only serve to throw a spotlight on the many attempts at scene-setting that don''t rise to that level.

And his purveyance in the pedestrian is proven through the on-the-nose limpness of his dialogue prose. There''s no shortage of flat expositional deliveries like this: “Being in the movies, Kiki, doesn’t shield you from what goes on in the real world. And the people she’s talking about are very much from the real world, where politics is a game with no rules, and they’re determined to make me help them" and "When my husband and I were struggling to get out of Germany, Paris was my dream. Just get there, I thought, and everything will be perfect. But it turned out that this wasn’t so, not for my husband, wherever he is tonight, and not really for me either, until I met you. Then it, the city, kept its promises.”

Yick. The characters, alas, are composed from the same cardboard; their job is to serve the strictures of the plot, not live and breathe of their own agency.

— Alan Furst''s high regard as a literary, even transcendent, trafficker in genre fiction. First is a favorite of The New York Times book critics and journalists, and it''s difficult to see why he alone has been accorded a status that could just as easily — and perhaps should have — gone to eminences like the late Philip Kerr.

At any rate, MISSION TO PARIS is fine. It''s well-written, well-plotted, impeccably authentic and authoritative, and yet leaves me after the last page with the same overstuffed but unsatisfied feeling I get from reading a Jack Reacher novel. Something that traffics in so much stylized exquisteness somehow should have led to a more exquisite reading experience. Instead, it''s merely top-shelf slick, commercial, genre fiction. Which is OK. But only just OK>
2 people found this helpful
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Suncoast
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Fascinating and imaginative pre-WWII espionage thriller
Reviewed in the United States on November 16, 2015
In late 1938 France is worried about the Nazis and Chamberlain''s infamous Munich deal with Hitler is about to happen. Paris is a hotbed of Nazi intrigue as the Germans try to soften up the country to destabilise the government and slow the building of the Maginot Line.... See more
In late 1938 France is worried about the Nazis and Chamberlain''s infamous Munich deal with Hitler is about to happen. Paris is a hotbed of Nazi intrigue as the Germans try to soften up the country to destabilise the government and slow the building of the Maginot Line.

It is around this background that Alan Furst sets this fascinating and imaginative espionage thriller where Hollywood star Fredric Stahl is sent by studio boss Jack Warner to make a film in Paris about soldiers from 3 countries at the end of WWI. Stahl was born in Austria but left for Hollywood several years ago and has little interest in going back to his country of birth which has recently been annexed by Germany.

Without his knowledge, Ribbentrop''s Foreign Ministry has plans to use Stahl for propaganda and invites him to Berlin to judge a festival of mountain based propaganda films. Stahl is reluctant to go but is put under pressure by the Germans, especially with threats to Stahl''s parents who still live in Austria. After an almost clandestine meeting with a senior US Embassy official, he is persuaded not only to go to Berlin but also to meet with Olga Orlova. a Russian émigré living in Berlin who is working for the Americans.

The descriptions of Paris at that time, especially the people that he meets and works with are interestingly authentic. The descriptions of Berlin and the people he meets are chilling. He arrives on the night of November 9, 1938 "Kristallnacht" which heralded the start of the German offensive against the Jews, with 30,000 German Jewish men being arrested and sent to concentration camps and Jewish property and businesses smashed across the city.

Initially, Stahl is an innocent bystander but gradually gets drawn into the conflict as the Germans turn up the heat and he becomes emotionally involved in what is happening to Germany. Furst creates Stahl as an ordinary but caring person, who is thrown into something that is well out of his depth but who finds the ability to protect himself while protecting others.

This is an excellent and imaginative WWII espionage thriller that kept me absorbed. I will certainly look out for other books in this series.
9 people found this helpful
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e s r
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Furst is foremost in WWII fiction
Reviewed in the United States on August 16, 2019
I have read all of Alan Furst''s novels several times over the years. This new one takes familiar Furst themes and mixes them in a new way so that the familiar becomes strange and exciting again. A new brew with familiar ingredients. Furst works with the pre WWII era and... See more
I have read all of Alan Furst''s novels several times over the years. This new one takes familiar Furst themes and mixes them in a new way so that the familiar becomes strange and exciting again. A new brew with familiar ingredients. Furst works with the pre WWII era and ensures that historically accurate events wind around his characters. Words fail to express the pleasure of reading Alan Furst''s work. The atmosphere, the history, the people. I could say more about this new addition to the great Night Soldiers series but would not want to spoil any part of the experience for other readers either new to Furst or old fans.
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Ned Leonard
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
LeCarre, very very light.
Reviewed in the United States on October 7, 2016
I was excited when I read with whom Alan Furst is so often compared (e.g. John LeCarre) and I thought a taste of that in an earlier, WWII era would be an engaging and satisfying read, especially on the tail of Anthony Doer''s "All the Light We Cannot See."... See more
I was excited when I read with whom Alan Furst is so often compared (e.g. John LeCarre) and I thought a taste of that in an earlier, WWII era would be an engaging and satisfying read, especially on the tail of Anthony Doer''s "All the Light We Cannot See." "Mission to Paris" was engaging enough, but not entirely satisfying, and now I''m mystified by the comparison to LeCarre. I wish I''d read some of the more skeptical reviews before I sprang for this one. It''s merely OK; not great nor entirely memorable. I had to refresh my memory about it when Amazon prompted me to review it. It didn''t leave much of footprint in pantheon of "good" reads.
9 people found this helpful
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Lloyd R. Free, author of CONFESSIONS OF A DAYTRADER (2016) and BITTERSWEET (2018)
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The great part about this novel is that you get a ...
Reviewed in the United States on February 25, 2018
Mission to Paris is the first novel in the night soldiers book series. The storyline was quite believable- an American movie star of Austrian dissent goes to Paris sent by the Warner Bros. film company to do a film in 1939. The great part about this novel is that you get a... See more
Mission to Paris is the first novel in the night soldiers book series. The storyline was quite believable- an American movie star of Austrian dissent goes to Paris sent by the Warner Bros. film company to do a film in 1939. The great part about this novel is that you get a real sense of what Paris was like just a few months before Hitler invaded France. The mood in Paris was one of denial-even though war was in the air and inevitable with Hitler and control. Moreover, the Nazis had a very strong fifth column in France working to undermine the legitimate, democratic government. The novel reveals the extent of the Nazi spy networks and the lengths they would go to to satisfy their masters in Berlin. This is a great read with many parallels to what is going on in America today.
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C. Q.
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Good Read
Reviewed in the United States on December 9, 2020
The plotting could have been tighter, but even tangential scenes resonated for me, because the characters, by and large, are interesting and realistic, and the atmospherics are strong. I haven''t read any of Furst''s other books. They all seem to revolve around pre-WW II and... See more
The plotting could have been tighter, but even tangential scenes resonated for me, because the characters, by and large, are interesting and realistic, and the atmospherics are strong. I haven''t read any of Furst''s other books. They all seem to revolve around pre-WW II and WW II in Europe. That for me is the only disincentive from trying another book by this author. I think the material has been picked over too much.
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Top reviews from other countries

J
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Chilling reminder that 1938 can happen today if we let it
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 31, 2019
Alan Furst writes today like it was written when it was set, in this case in 1938 when the Nazis were just a foreign populist movement in Germany.... or more, much more. Through the device of a diplomatic thriller set in Paris he gives us an international cast of characters...See more
Alan Furst writes today like it was written when it was set, in this case in 1938 when the Nazis were just a foreign populist movement in Germany.... or more, much more. Through the device of a diplomatic thriller set in Paris he gives us an international cast of characters who, one by one, get caught up in the gradual pernicious creep of Nazi influence in Europe. Very clever reminder of how a past ignored can become a past relived.
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Bass Man
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Atmospheric and intriguing
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 11, 2020
I really enjoyed this book, it was refreshingly different. The menace of living in this period in France seemed very authentic. If you are expecting car chases and heroic gunfights then look elsewhere but although it is not particularly exciting, it is intriguing and...See more
I really enjoyed this book, it was refreshingly different. The menace of living in this period in France seemed very authentic. If you are expecting car chases and heroic gunfights then look elsewhere but although it is not particularly exciting, it is intriguing and beautifully written. My own feeling was that the end seemed a bit rushed, this could have been an opportunity to ramp up the tension and added a fitting climax to the story and certainly would have been worth an extra star from me.
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Tony Danzig
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
By the numbers Furst novel, but still enjoyable
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 2, 2021
If you''ve read any of his books you know what to expect. There''s not a great deal of tension or direction to the plot. The main character stumbles through pre-war Parisian life, has some encounters, lovers, etc etc. Still...if you''re into the moody vibe of Furst and this...See more
If you''ve read any of his books you know what to expect. There''s not a great deal of tension or direction to the plot. The main character stumbles through pre-war Parisian life, has some encounters, lovers, etc etc. Still...if you''re into the moody vibe of Furst and this era of history, he is as great as always here.
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Jon Dee
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
An okay read for the tube, not profound
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 28, 2014
For start - I was disappointed by Alan Furst''s mission to Paris. I thought it was an easy "fast food" read, but was lacking a lot of profound ground for it to really appeal to me. The story is straight-forward. Boy comes to Paris - boy gets attention from many women...See more
For start - I was disappointed by Alan Furst''s mission to Paris. I thought it was an easy "fast food" read, but was lacking a lot of profound ground for it to really appeal to me. The story is straight-forward. Boy comes to Paris - boy gets attention from many women - boy selects the surprising "ugly duckling" - boy protects his women when in danger. In the meanwhile boy is becoming some sort of American spy/agent in Nazi Germany, oh and yes - boy (Fredric Stahl) is a famous American actor. "Mission to Paris" is not a bad read. Furst is talented, and he is writing about a very interesting period in our history, entangling it with spy and political intrigue. it is all very genuine and reliable, and the history side of things is accurate as well. It is gripping, but it lacks some sort of underlying element. i have been long searching for my new spy novel master to follow after practically finishing all of John Le Carré books.. Judging from this book - Furst is not the one. An okay read for the tube, no more - no less.
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Boot-Boy
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Menacing...
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 9, 2012
Another delicious treat from Alan Furst that kept me turning the pages with increasing urgency into the wee small hours. This is the ninth Furst novel I''ve read (what a delight to know I still haven''t worked my way through his entire backlist), and if it wasn''t quite the...See more
Another delicious treat from Alan Furst that kept me turning the pages with increasing urgency into the wee small hours. This is the ninth Furst novel I''ve read (what a delight to know I still haven''t worked my way through his entire backlist), and if it wasn''t quite the tour de force I was hoping for, it came very, very close. With Europe on the brink of war - Furst''s favourite stamping ground - Hollywood actor Frederic Stahl arrives in Paris to make a film only to find himself drawn into the murky, menacing world of Nazi propaganda, espionage, and supremacist war-mongering. What lifts Furst above genre rivals like Le Carré and Kerr is his snapshot, newsreel style - not a word wasted - his gloriously imagined cast of characters, and the brilliantly evoked noir atmosphere of Paris and Berlin. Highly recommended.
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