discount The Last Days 2021 of Night: new arrival A Novel online sale

discount The Last Days 2021 of Night: new arrival A Novel online sale

discount The Last Days 2021 of Night: new arrival A Novel online sale

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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • “A world of invention and skulduggery, populated by the likes of Edison, Westinghouse, and Tesla.”—Erik Larson
 
“A model of superior historical fiction . . . an exciting, sometimes astonishing story.”—The Washington Post
  
From Graham Moore, the Oscar-winning screenwriter of The Imitation Game and New York Times bestselling author of The Sherlockian, comes a thrilling novel—based on actual events—about the nature of genius, the cost of ambition, and the battle to electrify America.

New York, 1888. Gas lamps still flicker in the city streets, but the miracle of electric light is in its infancy. The person who controls the means to turn night into day will make history—and a vast fortune. A young untested lawyer named Paul Cravath, fresh out of Columbia Law School, takes a case that seems impossible to win. Paul’s client, George Westinghouse, has been sued by Thomas Edison over a billion-dollar question: Who invented the light bulb and holds the right to power the country?

The case affords Paul entry to the heady world of high society—the glittering parties in Gramercy Park mansions, and the more insidious dealings done behind closed doors. The task facing him is beyond daunting. Edison is a wily, dangerous opponent with vast resources at his disposal—private spies, newspapers in his pocket, and the backing of J. P. Morgan himself. Yet this unknown lawyer shares with his famous adversary a compulsion to win at all costs. How will he do it?

In obsessive pursuit of victory, Paul crosses paths with Nikola Tesla, an eccentric, brilliant inventor who may hold the key to defeating Edison, and with Agnes Huntington, a beautiful opera singer who proves to be a flawless performer on stage and off. As Paul takes greater and greater risks, he’ll find that everyone in his path is playing their own game, and no one is quite who they seem.

NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY THE WASHINGTON POST AND THE PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER

“A satisfying romp . . . Takes place against a backdrop rich with period detail . . . Works wonderfully as an entertainment . . . As it charges forward, the novel leaves no dot unconnected.” —Noah Hawley, The New York Times Book Review

Review

“A satisfying romp . . . Takes place against a backdrop rich with period detail . . . Works wonderfully as an entertainment . . . As it charges forward, the novel leaves no dot unconnected.” —Noah Hawley, The New York Times Book Review

“This captivating historical novel illuminates a fascinating American moment.” People

“A fascinating portrait of American inventors . . . Moore crafts a compelling narrative out of [Paul] Cravath’s cunning legal maneuvers and [Nikola] Tesla’s world-changing tinkering, while a story line on opera singer Agnes Huntington has the mysterious glamour of  The Great Gatsby. . . . Moore weaves a complex web. . . .  He conjures Gilded Age New York City so vividly, it feels like only yesterday.” Entertainment Weekly

“A model of superior historical fiction . . . Graham Moore digs deep into long-forgotten facts to give us an exciting, sometimes astonishing story of two geniuses locked in a brutal battle to change the world. . . . [A] brilliant journey into the past.” The Washington Post

Devil in the White City fans, you''ll adore this one. . . . Secret societies, private spites, vast fortunes—this book has it all. But the way all its stories fit together at the end will make you realize that everyone was playing their own game all along. But of course, only one will win.” Refinery 29

“A marvelous legal thriller set in a magical time when inventions were truly wonders, [Moore] knows how to grab your attention and not let go. . . . This is historical fiction at its very best. . . . The Last Days of Night is just as crackling as the electricity at its very core.” Fredericksburg Free Lance-Star

“Moore’s writing is sharp and as energized as his topic. . . . This is a riveting book that will hold your attention and will illuminate many on the birth of light in America. Part legal thriller, part romance, injected with a history lesson. Worth the read.” Historical Novel Society

“Mesmerizing, clever, and absolutely crackling, The Last Days of Night is a triumph of imagination. Graham Moore has chosen Gilded Age New York as his playground, with outsized characters—Edison, Tesla, Westinghouse—as his players. The result is a beautifully researched, endlessly entertaining novel that will leave you buzzing.” —Gillian Flynn, author of Gone Girl

“In The Last Days of Night, Graham Moore takes us back to the dawn of light—electric light—into a world of invention and skulduggery, populated by the likes of Edison, Westinghouse, Tesla, and the novel’s hero, a young lawyer named Paul Cravath (a name that will resonate with ambitious law students everywhere). It’s part legal thriller, part tour of a magical time—the age of wonder—and once you’ve finished it, you’ll find it hard to return to the world of now.” —Erik Larson, author of The Devil in the White City

The Last Days of Night is a wonder, a riveting historical novel that is part legal thriller, part techno-suspense. This fast-paced story about the personal and legal clash over the invention of the light bulb is a tale of larger-than-life characters and devious doings, and a significant meditation on the price we as a society pay for new technology. . . . Thoughtful and hugely entertaining.” —Scott Turow

About the Author

Graham Moore is the New York Times bestselling author of The Sherlockian and the Academy Award–winning screenwriter for The Imitation Game, which also won a Writers Guild of America Award for best adapted screenplay. Moore was born in Chicago, received a B.A. in religious history from Columbia University in 2003, and now lives in Los Angeles.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

CHAPTER 1
The Last Days of Night
 
People don’t know what they want until you show it to them. —Steve Jobs
 
May 11, 1888
 
On the day that he would first meet Thomas Edison, Paul watched a man burn alive in the sky above Broadway.
 
The immolation occurred late on a Friday morning. The lunchtime bustle was picking up as Paul descended from his office building onto the crowded street. He cut an imposing figure against the flow of pedestrians: six feet four inches, broad shouldered, cleanshaven, clothed in the matching black coat, vest, and long tie that was to be expected of New York’s young professional men. His hair, perfectly parted on the left, had just begun to recede into a gentle widow’s peak. He looked older than his twenty-six years.
 
As Paul joined the throng along Broadway, he briefly noticed a young man in a Western Union uniform standing on a ladder. The workman was fiddling with electrical wires, the thick black cables that had recently begun to streak the skies of the city. They crisscrossed the thinner, older telegraph wires, and the spring winds had gusted them into a knotty bundle. The Western Union man was attempting to untangle the two sets of wires. He looked like a child flummoxed by enormous shoelaces.
 
Paul’s mind was on coffee. He was still new to the financial district, new to his law firm’s offices on the third floor of 346 Broadway. He hadn’t determined which of the local coffeehouses he preferred. There was the one to the north, along Walker. And the slower-serving but more fashionable one, on Baxter, with the rooster on the door. Paul was tired. The air felt good against his cheeks. He hadn’t been outside yet that day. He’d slept in his office the night before.
 
When he saw the first spark, he didn’t immediately realize what was happening. The workman grabbed hold of a wire and tugged. Paul heard a pop—just a quick, strange pop—as the man shuddered. Paul would later remember seeing a flash, even if at the time he wasn’t sure what it was. The workman reached out for support, grasping another wire with his free hand. This, Paul would come to understand, was the man’s mistake. He’d created a connection. He’d become a live conductor.
 
And then both of the workman’s arms jolted with orange sparks.
 
There had to be two hundred people crowding the street that morning, and every head seemed to turn at the same time. Financiers parading in their wide-brimmed top hats; stock traders’ assistants sprinting down to Wall Street clutching secret messages; social secretaries in teal skirts and sharp matching jackets; accountants out hunting for sandwiches; ladies in Doucet dresses visiting from Washington Square; local politicians eager for their duck lunches; a fleet of horses dragging thick-wheeled cabs over the uneven cobblestones. Broadway was the artery that fueled lower Manhattan. A wealth heretofore unknown on the face of the earth was burbling up from beneath these very streets. In the morning’s paper Paul had read that John Jacob Astor had just become officially richer than the Queen of England.
 
All eyes fixed on the man in the air. A blue flame shot from his mouth. The flame set fire to his hair. His clothes burned off instantly. He fell forward, his arms still wrapped around the wires. His feet dangled against the ladder. His body assumed the position of Jesus upon the cross. The blue flame fired through his mouth and melted the skin from his bones.
 
No one had screamed yet. Paul still wasn’t even sure what he was watching. He had seen violence before. He’d grown up on a Tennessee farm. Death and the dying were unspectacular sights along the Cumberland River. But he’d never seen anything like this.
 
Epochal seconds later, as the man’s blood poured onto the teenage newsboys below, the screaming began. A stampede of bodies fled the scene. Grown men knocked into women. The newsboys ran through the crowd, not heading anywhere in particular, simply running. Trying to pull the charred flesh from their hair.
 
The horses reared on their haunches, kicking their legs into the sky. Their hooves flew at the faces of their panicked owners. Paul was frozen in place until he saw a newsboy fall in front of the wheels of a two-horse carriage. The stallions shook at their reins, lurching forward and drawing the wheels toward the boy’s chest. Paul was not aware of making the decision to lunge—he simply did it. He grabbed the boy by the shoulder, pulling him out of the road.
 
Paul used his coat sleeve to brush the dirt and blood from the child’s face. But before Paul could check him for injuries, the boy fled into the crowd again.
 
Paul sat down against a nearby telegraph pole. His stomach churned. He realized he was panting and tried to steady his breath as he rested in the dirt.
 
It was another ten minutes before the ringing of bells announced the arrival of the firemen. Three horses pulled a water truck to a stop beside the grim scene. A half dozen firemen in black-buttoned uniforms lifted their disbelieving eyes to the sky. One reached instinctively for his steam-powered hose, but the rest simply gazed in horror. This was like no fire they’d ever witnessed. This was electricity. And the dark marvel of man-made lightning was as mysterious and incomprehensible as an Old Testament plague.
 
Paul sat transfixed for the forty-five minutes it took the fearful firemen to cut down the blackened body. He took in every detail of what he saw, not to remember, but to forget.
 
Paul was an attorney. And this was what his as yet brief career in the law had done to his brain. He was comforted by minutiae. His mortal fears could be assuaged only by an encyclopedic command of detail.
 
Paul was a professional builder of narratives. He was a teller of concise tales. His work was to take a series of isolated events and, shearing from them their dross, craft from them a progression. The morning’s discrete images—a routine labor, a clumsy error, a grasping arm, a crowded street, a spark of fire, a blood-speckled child, a dripping corpse—could be assembled into a story. There would be a beginning, a middle, and an end. Stories reach conclusions, and then they go away. Such is their desperately needed magic. That day’s story, once told in his mind, could be wrapped up, put aside, and recalled only when necessary. The properly assembled narrative would guard his mind from the terror of raw memory
 
Even a true story is a fiction, Paul knew. It is the comforting tool we use to organize the chaotic world around us into something comprehensible. It is the cognitive machine that separates the wheat of emotion from the chaff of sensation. The real world is overfull with incidents, brimming over with occurrences. In our stories, we disregard most of them until clear reason and motivation emerge. Every story is an invention, a technological device not unlike the very one that on that morning had seared a man’s skin from his bones. A good story could be put to no less dangerous a purpose.
 
As an attorney, the tales that Paul told were moral ones. There existed, in his narratives, only the injured and their abusers. The slandered and the liars. The swindled and the thieves. Paul constructed these characters painstakingly until the righteousness of his plaintiff—or his defendant—became overwhelming. It was not the job of a litigator to determine facts; it was his job to construct a story from those facts by which a clear moral conclusion would be unavoidable. That was the business of Paul’s stories: to present an undeniable view of the world. And then to vanish, once the world had been so organized and a profit fairly earned. A bold beginning, a thrilling middle, a satisfying end, perhaps one last little twist, and then . . . gone. Catalogued and boxed, stored for safekeeping.
 
All Paul had to do was to tell today’s story to himself and it would disappear. To revisit the images over and over in his head. Salvation through repetition.
 
But as it turned out, a flaming corpse over Broadway was only the second most terrifying thing that Paul Cravath would see that day.
 
Later that evening—after his secretary had departed to her Yorkville apartment, after his senior partners had retired to their upper Fifth Avenue three-stories, long after Paul had failed to leave for his Fiftieth Street bachelor’s flat and instead penned so many notes with his rubber Waterman that the blister popped on his right middle finger—a boy arrived at the office door. He bore a telegram.
 
“Your presence is desired immediately,” read the message. “Much to discuss in strictest confidence.”
 
It was signed “T. Edison.”
 
 
 
 

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4.6 out of 54.6 out of 5
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Capricorn One
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A very good fictionalized, but accurate, depiction of the Electricity inventor wars in the 1880s
Reviewed in the United States on July 1, 2017
While I was fascinated to read about the magical era of invention in the late 1800s, I would rather have read an in-depth, well researched non-fiction book, like those written by David McCullough, than a fiction book, even if based largely on fact. The central theme of the... See more
While I was fascinated to read about the magical era of invention in the late 1800s, I would rather have read an in-depth, well researched non-fiction book, like those written by David McCullough, than a fiction book, even if based largely on fact. The central theme of the book is the lengthy litigation ongoing between Thomas Edison, who advocated use of Direct Current (DC) based electricity, and George Westinghouse, who favored Alternating Current (AC). In the end, as we all now know, AC won out. Except for vehicles (and similar uses) which use DC current, the rest of our lives are powered by AC current, in which Nikolas Tesla (who plays a major role in this novel) played a significant part in development of the technology. Thomas Edison is pretty much portrayed as a narcissistic, self-centered, win at all costs character who will stop at nothing (lying, cheating, spying, etc.) to win at any cost - and he is well-backed in that regard by J.P. Morgan, who owns 60% of Edison General Electric. Ultimately, Edison''s refusal to move away from his significant investments in the less efficient Direct Current approach resulted in George Westinghouse (and others) to push AC as the standard for distributing electricity throughout the U.S., and Edison''s falling sales and profit prompted J.P. Morgan to remove him as head of Edison General Electric and move his investments into the AC technology led by George Westinghouse under the renamed General Electric company. Based on my quick research, it appears that the primary events, characters, activities, and results portrayed in this novel are accurate, so in that sense it does serve to not only enlighten the reader, but also to provide that knowledge couched in a pretty interesting storyline with some suspense, a love interest, and other more human events. I enjoyed the book.
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Robert P Gelms
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Wow, Wowser, Wowsest.
Reviewed in the United States on May 13, 2018
God Said, “Let There Be light.” Thomas Edison Said, “Not Yet.” By Bob Gelms Graham Moore is an exceptionally good writer who makes himself increasingly significant every time he touches a keyboard. In my view, he has already turned himself into a... See more
God Said, “Let There Be light.”
Thomas Edison Said, “Not Yet.”
By Bob Gelms

Graham Moore is an exceptionally good writer who makes himself increasingly significant every time he touches a keyboard. In my view, he has already turned himself into a writer who must be read. I’ll now read anything he writes.
Mr. Moore has won an Academy Award for the screenplay he wrote for the motion picture The Imitation Game. It also won him a Writers Guild of American Award from his peers and was nominated for a Golden Globe.
Flush with success, he quickly published his first novel, The Sherlockian. It raced up the charts into best-seller-land and I wrote about it in the last issue of 365ink. Tempus Fugit and along comes his second novel, The Last Days of Night. It, too, is a best seller but a bigger one at that and one of the best examples of historical fiction that comes to mind. If you’ll pardon a colloquialism, it’s a humdinger squared.
The events that take place in the book are all true. The major characters and a few of the minor ones are all real people. I found it incessantly fascinating. You will read about the relationships between George Westinghouse, Nicola Tesla, Thomas Edison, Westinghouse’s lawyer, Paul Cravath, an appearance by J. P. Morgan, and a whole congregation of New York socialites, mega-wealthy business men and politicians. Most of these relationships became poisonously deadly.
At issue first was the light bulb. Thomas Edison conned the public into believing that he had invented the little glass miracle that glowed in the dark. He didn’t. Men by the names of Sawyer, Man, and Joseph Swan did the real inventing and held the patents. Edison “borrowed” their work which gave him a massive leg-up. Edison improved the design just enough for the Patent Office to issue him a patent.
Then George Westinghouse did to Edison what Edison did to Sawyer, Man, and Swan. He made a better light bulb, but in Westinghouse’s case he did make a better bulb…much, much better in almost every way. Edison promptly sued Westinghouse for one billion dollars with a “B.”
While this was going on, there was a life and death struggle to see which form of electricity would wind up in use all over the world in people’s houses and businesses. Would it be Edison’s DC (direct current) which was massively inefficient, outrageously expensive, and horrifically dangerous? Or would it be Tesla’s and Westinghouse’s AC (alternating current) which was efficient, inexpensive, and safe? It was a war. Read and learn.
Nicola Tesla was a bona fide, 5 star, golden genius, the kind of genius that would be mentioned in the same sentence with Sir Isaac Newton and Leonardo da Vinci. He was also psychotic in the clinical sense. He described getting his ideas fully formed from dreams or hallucinations that were vivid, lasted days, and were sometimes scary. He, eventually, had a total nervous breakdown.
Tesla should have been born at the end of the 21st century. He was that far ahead of the times. In the 1890s, he described in detail television, cell phones, radio and wireless communication. When Gugliemo Marconi “invented” radio using 17 of Tesla’s patents, the court case that ensued went all the way to the SCOTUS. Six months after Tesla died a penniless vagrant in a flop house in New York, the SCOTUS vacated Marconi’s claim of inventing radio and gave the invention’s ownership to Tesla because of Marconi''s patent infringement. Nicola Tesla invented radio not Marconi.
Tesla worked for both Edison (which ended incredibly badly) and Westinghouse (which also ended badly). Tesla was not a businessman and being thrown into the proverbial tank with sharks like Morgan, Edison and Westinghouse, poor Nicola Tesla was torn apart and eaten alive.
Westinghouse, Edison, J. P. Morgan, and Paul Cravath who was Westinghouse’s wunderkind attorney, managed to resist killing each other despite the fact that they all had serious thoughts of doing so. They came together in a genius settlement that Mr. Cravath, who was 27 years old at the time, devised. That didn’t stop a massively hostile takeover attempt by one or more of the lads of one or more of the existing companies. The Edison General Electric Company, in what was nothing more than a malicious act of payback by someone who had the power to do it, removed Edison’s name from the company and that, dear reader, is how we got General Electric.
Graham Moore’s The Last Days of Night is a grand slam home run. It’s wonderfully written, plotted and spellbinding. It is endlessly entertaining. I give it 8 stars out of a possible 5. You will not be disappointed.
38 people found this helpful
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F. Moyer
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Historical Fiction… or … Fictionalized History
Reviewed in the United States on December 7, 2017
I don’t read a lot of historical fiction – probably because I read a fair amount of non-fiction -- including history books and biographies. Perhaps some people like historical fiction because some history books can be dry and historical fiction can “kick it up a notch”.... See more
I don’t read a lot of historical fiction – probably because I read a fair amount of non-fiction -- including history books and biographies. Perhaps some people like historical fiction because some history books can be dry and historical fiction can “kick it up a notch”. And historical fiction can just imagine what historical characters might have said – thus eliminating the effort that history books and biographies have to do by extracting text from memoirs and other historical records. I’m just not used to authors shuffling the timeline and imagining conversations to make a work of fiction with pieces of history that many or may not have actually occurred.

For this book, the historical events appear to drive the story, and yet those events just seem to be a background for this fictionalized effort. But as a work of fiction, the story is just not that exciting. And though the historical aspects are true in a general sense, the majority of the details are simply fiction.

The best historical fiction I’ve read: “The Killer Angels” by Michael Shaara.
The best biography I’ve read: Alexander Hamilton by Ron Chernov
25 people found this helpful
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greengirl
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Don''t read unless you like historical inaccuracies
Reviewed in the United States on August 18, 2017
If you care about historical accuracy at all you will not be a fan of this book. Too often American history is used as fodder for entertainment without cause. Tesla is turned into a caricature of himself and drama is created where it wasn''t needed. This book made a mockery... See more
If you care about historical accuracy at all you will not be a fan of this book. Too often American history is used as fodder for entertainment without cause. Tesla is turned into a caricature of himself and drama is created where it wasn''t needed. This book made a mockery of a turning point in history by implementing a love story that was unnecessary. It and read more like a simplistic movie script. My book club members liked it. I did not.

If you''re going to write a book of ''historical fiction'' then do not use the name of individuals who actually lived at that time. Otherwise it''s not only untrue, but it will confuse those who aren''t familiar with that specific time and place. If you want to know something of Tesla as he truly lived watch the amazing PBS series about him. This book just annoyed me. I like historical fiction in terms of learning about a time and place you wouldn''t know otherwise, but why the author didn''t just change the name instead of choosing to be inaccurate I do not understand.
30 people found this helpful
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Mark H.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great book for lawyers, scientists, engineers, or those interested in American history, electricity, or the Victorian era
Reviewed in the United States on June 20, 2017
I bought this book because I had read a few other books about Tesla, Edison, and the War of the Currents. I am attending law school beginning in the fall, so the legal side of this book appealed to me as well. The day after it arrived, I started reading it, and I couldn''t... See more
I bought this book because I had read a few other books about Tesla, Edison, and the War of the Currents. I am attending law school beginning in the fall, so the legal side of this book appealed to me as well. The day after it arrived, I started reading it, and I couldn''t put it down. The following day, I finished it and recommended it to my mother, who has never read any fiction or nonfiction about this time period, and she reacted the same way. She hasn''t put it down since.

The characters were well-developed throughout, and the story flowed very well. I thought that it was odd how the author broke up the chapters, as it seemed inconsistent, but it didn''t affect the quality of the book.

When I first started reading, I realized some factual errors in the story (because I already had some background knowledge about Tesla, Edison, Westinghouse, and this time period), and it bothered me a bit, because the book seemed like it intended to be mostly factual where history was concerned and fictional only in the unrecorded details. After the story ends, the author has a section explaining all the factual inaccuracies, and explaining why he changed them. This made it the single best piece of historical fiction I''ve read, and I was deeply satisfied.
9 people found this helpful
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Michael Sholders
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Alternating Current vs Direct Current: An Historic Clash
Reviewed in the United States on December 20, 2017
A masterpiece of real history woven in a fictional setting. I haven’t enjoyed a book as much as this one in quite a while. This is a story about scientific invention and industrial application, all revolving around electricity. The inventors, Thomas Edison, George... See more
A masterpiece of real history woven in a fictional setting. I haven’t enjoyed a book as much as this one in quite a while. This is a story about scientific invention and industrial application, all revolving around electricity. The inventors, Thomas Edison, George Westinghouse, and Nikola Tesla really were central characters in the so-called “Current War” which took place from 1888-1896. This war was the labor pains involved in deciding whether electricity should be direct current or alternating current, and how to distribute either one became a scientific focal point. The matter of how electricity was harnessed and utilized was largely a business decision that required capital, and lots of it. This is where the JP Morgan’s of the early American scene come into the story. The young lawyer, Paul Cravath, really did represent Westinghouse in defending the 312 lawsuits brought about by Thomas Edison. He eventually married Agnes Huntington, who was a society opera singer in New York at the time. They went on to become philanthropists and community leaders in the world of artistic expression and culture. This book has intrigue as its’ underlying theme, and it mixes love, greed, and reality into a very satisfying and educational read. I loved this book.
One person found this helpful
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Steven Meisel
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Fascinating insight into the early pairing of technology and business
Reviewed in the United States on December 10, 2017
I knew and thought little about the origins of the modern electrical system. While obviously aware of the names Edison, Westinghouse, and Tesla, the competition, intrigue, and early battles about creating a nationwide electrical system & standard has always been obscure to... See more
I knew and thought little about the origins of the modern electrical system. While obviously aware of the names Edison, Westinghouse, and Tesla, the competition, intrigue, and early battles about creating a nationwide electrical system & standard has always been obscure to me. Truth be told, I always took this for granted and didn''t much care.

That is, until I read the remarkable historical fiction "The Last Days of Night". With a very easy-to-read style, Moore brings to life the issues, the personalities, and the importance of the debates in this most important chapter of history. While much of the dialog and timeline is fictionalized, the basic facts, problems, flow, and outcomes are very accurate. As a bonus, the book includes insight into the development of the now-modern system of legal practice.

I can see this book becoming a motion picture in the near future.

Highly recommended for anyone with an interest in these over-sized personalities.
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A Meticulous Reader
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Very good read
Reviewed in the United States on April 6, 2021
Read this book for a book club and found it a good read once you get into it. Even with it''s gruesome opening, I wasn''t intrigued. But it is a very good story based on true events. I am extremely grateful to the author for very taking the time to very meticulously give you... See more
Read this book for a book club and found it a good read once you get into it. Even with it''s gruesome opening, I wasn''t intrigued. But it is a very good story based on true events. I am extremely grateful to the author for very taking the time to very meticulously give you the fiction vs non-fiction of the book in the back. It is very much appreciated and shows how very well he did his research. Given this is centered on Science (my least favorite subject) I really did enjoy it. And I''m grateful for the time he took to explain things in layman''s terms as I would truly have been lost. I totally appreciate the education. I also liked that it was something different outside of some of the other historical novels I read. I''d definitely give it 4.5 stars. I think my expectations (and what I''m somewhat use too) is most of the characters being fictional and not all. I didn''t read the back of the book first. I am very familiar with Edison and Westinghouse but wasn''t so much with Tesla. So therefore did not know of the other character''s history (although wondered if Cravath was related to one of the co-founders of Fisk University. And he is. So this is a very, very good novel and thanks to Mr. Moore detailed info on the characters in the back, an excellent start to digging deeper into the history of great Scientist/Inventors. Thanks Mr. Moore for a very insightful Science History lesson (the best way to get me to learn Science :) )
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Top reviews from other countries

fionna
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
An entrancing ''factionary'' based on the legal fight over the light bulb.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 8, 2017
This beautifully crafted book tells the tale of the fight to spread the use of electricity through the story of a young lawyer briefed by Westinghouse in the patent struggle over the lightbulb with Edison. The main character come to life brilliantly and I found myself...See more
This beautifully crafted book tells the tale of the fight to spread the use of electricity through the story of a young lawyer briefed by Westinghouse in the patent struggle over the lightbulb with Edison. The main character come to life brilliantly and I found myself repeatedly turning to Google searches to find out more about them. I also ended up wondering what Westinghouse, Edison and Tesla would be thinking now if they saw the world lit up by the world...and the evidence of global warming. They''d surely be at the cutting edge of alternative ''green'' energy.
4 people found this helpful
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N.C.Harrison
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Bring history to life
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 30, 2018
Things we now take for granted - electric supply - had to start somewhere. This is its story, but told as a novel with invented and real people that explains how it all happened. Very enjoyable read and it made me look further into Nikola Tesla''s life. Fascinating stuff....See more
Things we now take for granted - electric supply - had to start somewhere. This is its story, but told as a novel with invented and real people that explains how it all happened. Very enjoyable read and it made me look further into Nikola Tesla''s life. Fascinating stuff. This book brings it to life in a very interesting and readable way. Highly recommend.
One person found this helpful
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lullaboo
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great read!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 17, 2018
Crackingly good story based on the feud between Edison and Westinghouse. Some spinning (which the author admits) keeps this page turner and the reader on its toes. Don''t let the topic put you off! This is an enthralling read and up there with the best of crime stories. I...See more
Crackingly good story based on the feud between Edison and Westinghouse. Some spinning (which the author admits) keeps this page turner and the reader on its toes. Don''t let the topic put you off! This is an enthralling read and up there with the best of crime stories. I came to it via Erik Larsen who also writes historical novels based on real events. Loved his books but this an equal. Spoil yourself
One person found this helpful
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Philip T King
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Electrifying.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 1, 2019
Electrifying combination of story telling a historic fact to tell a fascinating tale of marrying technology, innovation and business savvy that acts as a blue print for today tech titans... beats a bland biography.
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JH
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A good read
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 17, 2021
The Last Days of Night is a well crafted novel. Fitting characters in the novel to historical people and events of the time makes a really interesting read. Thank you.
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